Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



Accuracy and reverting to the mean
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 9:54 am
Talarian has a very niche post up, discussing accuracy in games. The chance to hit with an attack that is, not whether the things depicted in those games are accurate, which is a completely different can of worms. Talarian points out that if the game is designed around a few, decisive attacks, you are more likely to feel the effect of randomness. If there are many small attacks, missing a few doesn't matter so much, and is felt much less.

I found that interesting because it pretty much describes my main point of contention with 5th edition Dungeons & Dragons. I prefer 4th edition Dungeons & Dragons, whose combat has with some justification been described as "slow". Basically in 4E everybody has a lot of hit points, and you need several good hits to bring an enemy down. In 5E the characters have a lot less hit points, deal more damage, and thus fights are over much quicker. But because of what Talarian describes, the 5E combat is much more likely to produce random results. In 5E it matters less whether the player has good tactics or otherwise made good choices, he can be downed in round one by a critical hit before he even acted. Fast, yes, but for me that speed comes with too much of a price.

I especially hate critical hits in 5E. In 4E a critical hit deals maximum damage. Only at later levels, when you have magical weapons, do you get additional dice to roll. In 5E you get double the dice on a critical even at level 1. So a simple arrow dealing 1d6 damage does 6 damage in 4E, and 2d6 damage in 5E. Which very much opens up the chance of the high attack roll being followed by a high damage roll, for up to 12 points of damage. Which knocks out most level 1 characters.

Of course the early death of a key player can create some good narrative. But it also removes damage potential from the player's side, so makes the combat slower again. From a social point of view it is awkward having a player just sit there, not able to participate, just rolling death saves for the rest of the encounter. Especially if it is due to no fault of his own.

I guess that is a typical example of me putting gameplay over narrative. I would like the outcome of a combat to be determined by tactics, not by chance, even if that makes the game more predictable and less fast.
Tobold's Blog



My epic Wurm Online journey to retrieve my corpse
Posted by [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 1:16 pm
When you die in Wurm (I died when my character was attacked by some creatures and then drowned) you have to “respawn” and lose some items and some skill levels. I respawned back at the newbie area on Deliverance and ran back to my corpse. I filmed this while I did. It took over an … Continue reading My epic Wurm Online journey to retrieve my corpse


Great PR
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 8:57 am
Wherever you stand on the issue of the Greek referendum, you need to admire Greece for its great public relations: Everywhere the story is how the plucky Greeks said "no" to the evil European loan sharks that want to suck all the life out of Greece. Debt forgiveness is widely demanded.

Actually I am for debt forgiveness as well. I mean, there isn't much chance that Greece will ever pay back its loans and bailouts, so you might as well write the money off right away. But maybe even more importantly, it might change the narrative to be somewhat kinder to the rest of Europe: Because what Greece wants isn't simple debt forgiveness. They want fresh money, their debt forgiven in order to then be able to take out new loans. They want to continue living a lifestyle where the state spends far more money than its revenue. Yes, of course Greece's GDP would look a lot better with unlimited free money from elsewhere, but can you really blame the rest of Europe for not wanting to throw more money into that bottomless pit?

I think the rest of Europe should forgive the Greek debt, and then hold a referendum on whether to give the Greeks more money. I'd bet the people of Europe would vote "Oxi" to that. And for the Greeks it is a lot harder to walk around with signs saying "We demand your money!" instead of "No to austerity".
Tobold's Blog



The Daily Grind: What’s the most addictive collection minigame you’ve played?
Posted by Massively Overpowered [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 8:00 am
I’ve been playing a lot of Assassin’s Creed: Rogue here lately, and while it’s certainly no MMO, it has managed to remind me of the MMO space’s more addictive mechanics courtesy of its collection minigames. I’ve spent far more time sailing around the North Atlantic (and the rooftops of colonial New York) looking for floating musical shanties and glowing animus [...]


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Deed hunting and blue whales in Wurm Online! https://t.co/Pu2G4Istwq via @WurmOnline


An esoteric question on WoW missions
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 7:12 am
Warlords of Draenor introduced a new offline element into World of Warcraft: Missions, where you send out your followers or since recently ships for hours. You need to select the right mix of skills of your followers (or equipment of your ships) for the challenges of the mission, and on success you are rewarded. Many missions only give experience for your followers/ships, but some give rewards to the player, like gold, apexis crystals, or even raid gear.

And here lies my problem: The missions that only give experience become useless after your followers / ships reach epic status. So I don't know if I should still do those missions that only give experience. What I don't know is whether doing experience missions alters the spawn time of the treasure missions. If I "clear" all experience missions, do I get new missions faster? If I stop doing experience missions, will I get stuck at some point with having only unfinished missions of that type and never get new treasure missions any more? As sending out followers / ships on missions costs resources, can I safely save those resources and ignore those missions?

Anybody know?
Tobold's Blog



Star Citizen Persistent Universe – Are you Prepared for Permadeath?
Posted by Home of my personas Saylah and Alysianah [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 7:00 am
If you’re late to the Star Citizen (SC) party and still catching up on the encyclopedic amount of published content and videos to wade through, let me draw your attention to the fact that there is permadeath (PD) in the persistent universe. This will be the first MMO I’ve played with PD. I’ve played the high stakes lose your ship mechanics of EVE Online, where I’ve actually heard men cry on voice chat after losing billions+ ISK ships and their rare implants. But even in EVE, your character at least, is immortal. That won’t be the case in SC.


Xanadu Impalong – July 24-27
Posted by MmoQuests.com [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 6:15 am
  I love impalongs. I’ve participated in a few over the years, depending on what server they were hosted at. Since moving to Xanadu it’s very rare that I ever travel to another map,...


Fire Emblem’s Terrible, Horrible Gay Conversion Romance
Posted by Zen Of Design [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 6 July 2015, 1:02 am
Say what you will about Hatred – it’s a mediocre game that manufactured outrage in order to generate a modicum of buzz so that the Perpetual Outrage Machine would be duped into buying a few copies.  But hey, at least they were aware of, and were trying to be, offensive.  It’s harder to get a good read on […]


I love the whole primitive/16 bit thing but dear god it’s hard to read that stuff on large monitors. Give an option like Minecraft does!


The untold story of a failed Nintendo game 6 years in the making
Posted by Engadget RSS Feed [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 8:31 pm
Nintendo's 'Project H.A.M.M.E.R'

Nintendo has had a number of high-profile flops (Virtual Boy, anyone?). However, one of its biggest failures may have been one you heard almost nothing about -- at least, until now. Unseen64 has published a documentary detailing the largely unknown story of Project H.A.M.M.E.R (aka MachineX), a Wii game from Nintendo Software Technology that died after nearly six years of painful development that began in 2003. The hammer-swinging sci-fi brawler was supposed to be mostly finished by the time it was first acknowledged in 2005, but a culture clash between the Japanese management and American staff all but killed progress. The two sides had differing ideas about what would fix the mediocre gameplay. The top brass thought better environments would improve things, for example, while the rank-and-file wanted to overhaul the core gameplay mechanics.

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Via: NeoGAF

Source: Unseen64 (YouTube)




Wurm Online deed chase! Looking for HOME!: http://t.co/H6OJSkSoJ3


Well, I stole a boat on accident and watched a blue whale get murdered. Film at 11. @wurmonline ….


Star Citizen Writer's Guide - Audio Version Episode 11
Posted by Home of my personas Saylah and Alysianah [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 8:19 pm
Here's the audio version of the Star Citizen Writer's Guide 11. This episode is purely for writers and contains no lore. It provides a quick start guide for fiction writing techniques. Listen via YouTube Show Notes: Unofficial Star Citizen Soundtrack used as background music RSI published version of Writer's Guide Part 11 Link to audio version of Star Citizen Writer's Guide Part Ten


MMO Week in Review: Playing devils, punching dinos (July 5, 2015)
Posted by Massively Overpowered [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 8:00 pm
Were you too busy gaming this week to pay attention to MMO news? Get caught up every Sunday evening with Massively Overpowered’s Week in Review! Trion confirmed this week that it is indeed porting Korean MMOARPG Devilian Online to the west as Devilian. In a welcome letter posted to the community, the head devs asserted that the game deserves the MMO label, talking [...]


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Honestly, I could not care less about sport. Sports. Sportage. But GO USA!!!


Behind the scenes: The sights and sounds of World of Warships’ vessels
Posted by Massively Overpowered [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 6:00 pm
Immersion. That’s not a word you often hear associated with lobby-based PvP games. But in the case of World of Warships, the third title in Wargaming’s WWII-era trilogy, it’s more than just fitting; it’s defining. Although not a battle simulation, WoWS offers a genuinely immersive experience thanks to the historical authenticity and the level of detail in both the audio [...]


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1 million gold
Posted by Tobold's Blog [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 4:33 pm
Friday I was thinking that I might be getting close to having 1 million gold on my World of Warcraft characters. So I installed an addon (Accountant) to do the math and found that I had over 900k, but was just short of a million. So I used the materials I had in stock to craft some stuff and earned another 100k this weekend. So now I really have over a million gold in WoW.

To put this in perspective, the price of the WoW Token recently spiked at just over 50k gold when the patch came out, and has since gone down to under 50k again. The tokens I bought in the past were 2 for 32k each, and one for 42k, and the tendency for the price is currently falling (I guess there was a rush to buy gametime for the patch which has since receded). But even if we say the price of the WoW Token is 50k gold, I would have enough gold for 20 months of WoW. As I've been earning over 100k a month in this expansion after expenses, I've gone infinite, and I wasn't even planning to. I just played what was fun to me.
Tobold's Blog



WildStar’s devs spill more on F2P transition
Posted by Massively Overpowered [HTML][XML][PERM][FULL] on 5 July 2015, 4:00 pm
The picture of WildStar’s future is slowly starting to emerge from the haze with continuing discussion from Carbine Studios about this fall’s business model shift and major game changes. Last Friday’s studio livestream saw the devs spending nearly the entire time talking about free-to-play and what players can expect when it hits. Among the topics included the always-on sprint, how [...]


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I had to run over an hour to get my old corpse in @wurmonline last night. I filed most of it. https://t.co/SESNx140z7


Well, made it to the Whispering Wood in Wurm. Need to make a deed stake and find out where to put the deed! Ideas?


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